Lyla Foy stops by New Hot

by David Safar, Leah Garaas

Lyla Foy
Lyla Foy (Courtesy of the artist)
  1. Listen Feature audio

    Apr 29, 2014 Listen to all 4 tracks:
    Lyla Foy In-Studio
    Lyla Foy - Impossible (Live in The Current Studio)
    Lyla Foy - Honeymoon (Live in The Current Studio)
    Lyla Foy - Feather Tongue (Live in The Current Studio)

Growing up, London singer-songwriter Lyla Foy was a fan of writing. It was only a matter of time before she picked up a guitar and realized writing songs was the perfect way to tell her stories. Plus they match her attention span, she says.

Foy's new record, Mirrors the Sky, has a distinctly personal yet relatable feel to it. When New Hot host Daivd Safar asked her where people should listen to the record, she responds, "Driving in a vehicle," without hesitation.

Listen to the whole in-studio session to hear David Safar chat with Lyla about her decision not to play piano like her musical influences Fiona Apple and Tori Amos; of her upbringing; how she got the courage to break out of her bedroom singer shell; and her upcoming summer tour plans with Sharon Van Etten.

Songs Performed

"Impossible"
"Honeymoon"
"Feather Tongue"

All songs off Mirrors the Sky, out now on Sub Pop.

Hosted by David Safar
Engineered by Michael DeMark

Guests

  • Lyla Foy

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