Events Calendar

Rock The New Pornographers

Sponsored by 89.3 The Current

The New Pornographers
When
doors
show
Venue
First Avenue www.first-avenue.com
701 1st Ave. N
Minneapolis, MN 55403
(612) 332-1775
Tickets

On sale Monday, August 11, 2014, 10:00 AM

$25.00, advance
$28.00, doors

featuring A.C. Newman, Neko Case and Dan Bejar (Destroyer)

The New Pornographers perform live in The Current studio

The New Pornographers are A.C. Newman, Blaine Thurier, Dan Bejar, John Collins, Kathryn Calder, Kurt Dahle, Neko Case and Todd Fancey. Brill Bruisers is the first new release in four years from the acclaimed supergroup, who have been called, “virtually peerless in the world of power-pop and indie-rock” by NPR Music. Additionally, the New Yorker describes the band’s music as, “...magnificent and clever…,” while Stereogum proclaims, “In recent history, no group has featured so much formidable established talent, collaborating on a regular basis.”

Of the album, lead-singer and main songwriter AC Newman comments, “This is a celebration record. After periods of difficulty, I am at a place where nothing in my life is dragging me down and the music reflects that.” Produced by band-members John Collins (bass) with Newman, the 12-track album was recorded primarily at Little Blue in Woodstock, NY and at JC/DC Studios in Vancouver B.C. with additional recording in Austin, Brooklyn and Vermont. Newman adds, “We wanted Xanadu and we wanted Sigue Sigue Sputnik, which translated into sparklier and faster.”

Since their debut in 2000, The New Pornographers have released five studio albums including their most recent, Together (2010), of which, NPR Music praised, “Unimpeachable pop gems…these are the songs of summer” while ELLE magazine asserted, “The New Pornographers have done what all great bands do: Evolve…unpretentious and unbelievably infectious” and the Associated Press heralded, “…Together finds them at their peak. The melding of Newman’s voice with Neko Case and Kathryn Calder is endlessly inventive, weaving in and out of the nervous-sounding rhythm that is the band’s calling card. The first four songs are what the Electric Light Orchestra meant to achieve but never quite did.”

18+