Music News: Mary Tyler Moore fans turn to Husker Du to celebrate her memory

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Mary Tyler Moore waves to the crowd in Minneapolis in 2002.
Actress Mary Tyler Moore waves to the crowd next to the statue honoring her May 8, 2002 in Minneapolis. The statue depicts Moore tossing her hat from the opening credits of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." (Mike Ekern | Getty Images)

Actor Mary Tyler Moore has died at age 80, best-remembered as the star of the eponymous '70s TV show set in Minneapolis. Hüsker Dü fans are well-acquainted with the St. Paul band's cover of "Love is All Around," the show's theme song, and have been turning it up in Moore's memory. The band often played the song live, and released their version as the B-side of the "Makes No Sense at All" single. It's still a staple of Bob Mould’s solo sets. (Billboard)

The music world is also mourning three notables:

Drummer Butch Trucks was a founding member of the Allman Brothers Band. Trucks played alongside fellow drummer Jai "Jaimoe" Johnny Johanson. "If James Brown can have two drummers," Trucks remembered Duane Allman saying, "so can I!" Trucks has died at age 69. (Billboard)

Lee O'Denat was the founder of the website WorldStarHipHop.com. Covering hip-hop news and gossip, WorldStarHipHop was one of America's biggest music sites during its peak from 2005 to 2010. O'Denat died on Monday, at age 43, of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. (New York Times)

Ukulelist Eddie Kamae has died at age 89. With his band the Sons of Hawaii in the 1960s and '70s, Kamae helped to lead the movement that became known as the Hawaiian renaissance. "He was the first virtuoso on the instrument," said fellow ukulele star Jake Shimabukuro about Kamae. "He came up with techniques to apply to the ukulele that no one ever dreamed of doing back then." (New York Times)

Today's Prince news

Adele’s 25 was the top-selling album of 2016 — but the artist who sold the most albums in total was Prince, reports Forbes. Among Prince's achievements on the way to selling 2.2 million albums in 2016: he set a new record by placing 19 albums simultaneously in the Billboard 200.

Who will serve as personal advisor to Comerica, the bank taking over as administrator of Prince's estate — L. Londell McMillan, favored by some of Prince's family, or Van Jones, preferred by other members? Neither, decided Judge Kevin Eide, who said he thinks Comerica can communicate directly with Prince's six presumptive heirs. (Billboard)

Lots of people had the impression that last fall's official Prince tribute concert was mismanaged — and now it turns out that his family members shared that impression. "In a court document filed Wednesday," reports the Star Tribune, "Prince's sister Tyka Nelson and his half-brother Omarr Baker accused Bremer Trust and well-known entertainment lawyers L. Londell McMillan and Charles Koppelman of mismanaging the star-studded concert and refusing to turn over profits."

Bryant Gumbel says he has "three Prince songs that have never seen the light of day." The recordings were prospective theme songs Prince wrote when Gumbel launched a news show in 1998. "He took a run at it and I didn't like it," said Gumbel. "After three tries I called it off. It was becoming embarrassing — a guy who can't read music can't tell Mozart, 'No, this isn't good.'" (USA Today)

England to issue Bowie stamps

England's Royal Mail has announced the release of ten stamps honoring David Bowie. The stamps, which include both album covers and live performance photos, will be released on March 14. (Pitchfork)

Persuasions member sues Apple over Jamie xx song

Jamie xx’s song "I Know There's Gonna Be (Good Times)" appeared in an ad for the iPhone 6. Now, Apple is being sued by a member of the group sampled in the song. Singer Jerome Lawson of the Persuasions notes that his voice is "prominent and recognizable in the Apple commercial," and that Apple is violating his right of publicity by using the recording in an advertisement. (Billboard)

Billy Bragg rewrites Dylan classic

Billy Bragg has shared a rewritten version of Bob Dylan’s generational anthem "The Times They Are A-Changin'." In Bragg's sarcastic new version, the times are "a-changin' back" thanks to the policies of Donald Trump. (Rolling Stone)


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