Musicheads Essential Artist: Stevie Nicks

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Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction 2019
Inductee Stevie Nicks performs at the 2019 Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony - Show at Barclays Center on March 29, 2019 in New York City. (Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images)
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Musicheads Essential Artist: Stevie Nicks
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March is Women's History Month. To celebrate, each weekday this month we'll be spotlighting a different artist with special coverage on air and online. For Tuesday, March 10, we're shining a light on Stevie Nicks.

Stevie Nicks is a pioneering songwriter, entrancing live performer, and a key member of the chart-topping Fleetwood Mac.

Born Stephanie Nicks in Phoenix, Arizona in 1948, little Stevie showed an interest in music from a young age. By the time she was a senior in high school, she'd found a creative partner in Lindsey Buckingham and joined his band Fritz as their new lead singer. While she was playing in Fritz, Stevie had the opportunity to open for San Francisco legends like Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix, who she cites as huge inspirations.

By the early '70s, Fritz had disbanded and Stevie and Lindsey were writing as a duo, releasing the album Buckingham Nicks in 1973 and landing on the radar of Mick Fleetwood, who was searching for a new guitarist for his band Fleetwood Mac.

It's hard to overstate the significance of the role that Stevie Nicks played in Fleetwood Mac's success. Their first album together, Fleetwood Mac, showed off Stevie's songwriting talent with her songs "Rihannon" and "Landslide" becoming hits. Onstage, Stevie collaborated with a clothing designer to develop her trademark bohemian style. Her flowing shirts and shawls and mystical stage presence were the perfect complement to Fleetwood Mac's enveloping sound.

By the late '70s, Fleetwood Mac's Rumours had scored four top ten singles and won the Grammy for Album of the Year, and Stevie Nicks had become a household name. Stevie launched her solo career to wild success in 1981, earning the title "the reigning queen of rock and roll" from Rolling Stone magazine.

In the decades since, she's battled a substance abuse disorder and gone through recovery. She's reunited for powerful tours with Fleetwood Mac, and she's become equally respected as a solo artist and a member of that group. In 2019, at the age of 70, she became the first woman to be inducted twice into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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